Reviews

The book is doing me giz giz. Reading a chapter, you’d think that’s where all the treasure ends. Okay, I’m doing a thread on this. Then few lines into the next chapter, and you’re already lost in confusion—which one do I do now? Too good a book!

@akorive001

There is so much within that everyone here is enjoying. As a team, we are still unpacking the knowledge you've shared.

@NewsCentralTV

Without famzing @omojuwa, I can say this is one of the most professionally published books I’ve bought in recent times. Texture, content, feel and impact. All on point. I should get more copies for more friends

@sobafemi

Wow! oh my! @DGTLWealthbook it so insightful, educative, motivative and inspirational. Too good a book!

@T_OTunde

I can only doff my hat for his antithetical traits of being a fearless‌ ‌and‌ ‌lone trailblazer and a community galvanizer, all in one stroke! @Omojuwa

@kess_fofah

I have read over hundreds of pages from this book, my favorite chapter is Becoming the person of influence, the narration is very practicable, fact and figure

@yeyetinubu

@DGTLWealthBook, A book that exposes the wealth hiding in the 4th industrial revolution authored by @Omojuwa. We recommend this book for individuals, institutions and corporate organizations. Go get a copy!

@hypemanafrica

In this world of the digital economy, @DGTLWealthBook is a must-read for would-be billionaires in promoting shared prosperity.

@JaphetPhilip

It’s an amazing book that everyone should read — everyone that desires to be influential or wants to increase influence and wants to stay influential.

@seunolulana

Just began reading in Maiduguri. @Omojuwa's @DGTLWealthBook is just an amazing read.

@Serddieq

Read just 74 pages so far and I’m already astounded. Such a masterpiece. Detailed & inspiring. Great work

@el_kaumi

OFFICIAL BOOK REVIEW - By : Terfa Tilley-Gyado .

A lot of fantastic submissions and contributions have already been made about the author and the man of the hour so I shall confine myself, as your reviewer, to as plain and as short an exposition as I can possibly give you on JJ Omojuwa’s book ‘ Digital: The New Code of Wealth.’ It is regrettable however that in asking me to review this book, Mr. Omojuwa did not fully think his request through. When one asks someone to review their book, it is quite often predicated on 3 assumptions:

1. That the person likes you enough to accept the offer.
2. The person is a friend or owes you a favour of some sort
3. That the reviewer is good at their designated job.
Unfortunately, if Mr. Omojuwa has based his offer on any of these
3 assumptions, then he has completely missed road. And I will tell
you why.
1. I do not like Mr. Japheth Joshua Omojuwa…I love him.
2. Mr. Omojuwa is not my friend nor do I owe him any favour.
Mr. Omojuwa is my brother and he has a lifetime bank of
favours.
3. This reviewer is not good at his designated job…this reviewer
is great at his designated job

All joking aside, it is a great honour that has been bestowed on me by my brother even though he has presented me with two considerable challenges. The first is that he gave me the book only a week ago. I was initially daunted but it proved to be such a page turner that I read it in a day so that challenge was easily surmounted. The second challenge, which proved more enduring, is that I struggled to squeeze this wonderfully written book into a particular genre which is quite important when reviewing a book. Ostensibly, it is a reference book or even a self-help book. It is an unparalled and well documented account of the evolution of the digital space in the Nigerian context going back to the arrival of mobile telephony, the attendant connectivity issues right through to the growth of the sector, accessibility, the data explosion, to where we are today.

In reading, you also realise however that this book is also partly autobiographical and partly a memoir. The shaping of the Nigerian digital space is also the story of how Omojuwa became Omojuwa. In Chapters 1 and 2, titled ‘My Digital Journey’ and ‘Becoming a Person of Influence,’ respectively Omojuwa uses anecdotes from his own life to educate the reader on how best to harness the strength of the internet and social media. It made me curious to dig out some of Omojuwa’s first tweets which I could date back to February 19, 2010. Quite enigmatically, the first is a tweet linking to an article called the perverted celibate on his website omojuwa.com. And of course he tweeted a lot about some football club called in London called Arsenal but I will spare you all the heartbreak of making any references to that. 2 The New Code of Wealth as the title suggests, is also a personal finance guide. In Chapter 5, which is titled Digital Business: Africa’s New Money Bloc and Old Money’s Evolution, he uses several case studies which show almost unendingly diverse methods of monetising and tapping into the digital goldmine. I am not sure there is a book in existence that boasts such a rich ensemble of young successful Nigerians as can be found in this chapter in particular. The idea of such an ensemble presents yet another potential genre for this book: Crime. Admittedly this is mostly because the author is himself a criminal but apart from that, he has also appropriated the words and ideas of other successful entrepreneurs in the form of interviews. So, we have the uncommon privilege of learning not just how Omojuwa become a digital overlord, but also the success stories and cautionary tales of young Nigerian luminaries such as Idris Olorunnimbe, GCE of the Temple Management Company, Tolu Ogunlesi, the multiple award winning writer, Bidemi Zakariyau of LSF/PR, Gbenga Agboola of the game changing payments platform Flutterwave and a host of others too many to mention.

It is the ultimate cheatcode!

Finally, anyone who has encountered any of Omojuwa’s outputs will know that his wit and humour can be extremely sarcastic and I daresay mischievous. So, one can also make a case for The New Code of Wealth as a Satirical work. Although he names names where appropriate, other times the author skilfully paints a picture and leaves the rest to your imagination. Omojuwa breathessly navigates this vast spectrum of the bold new world and he writes with self-deprecation, wisdom and humour at every turn. The chapters and subheads are short but no less impactful for their terseness. 3 Beyond the specific topics I have mentioned, Omojuwa also delves into Faith, of which he is a most ardent devotee, Activism, which has got him into trouble on more than a couple of occasions and Government which resists the temptation to point fingers at past failings, rather it proffers salient solutions to better performance

Finally, anyone who has encountered any of Omojuwa’s outputs will know that his wit and humour can be extremely sarcastic and I daresay mischievous. So, one can also make a case for The New Code of Wealth as a Satirical work. Although he names names where appropriate, other times the author skilfully paints a picture and leaves the rest to your imagination. Omojuwa breathessly navigates this vast spectrum of the bold new world and he writes with self-deprecation, wisdom and humour at every turn. The chapters and subheads are short but no less impactful for their terseness. 3 Beyond the specific topics I have mentioned, Omojuwa also delves into Faith, of which he is a most ardent devotee, Activism, which has got him into trouble on more than a couple of occasions and Government which resists the temptation to point fingers at past failings, rather it proffers salient solutions to better performance

There is indeed something for everyone here and the book can be read chapter by chapter or in its entirety. I suppose that because I have said all these rather flowery things about this book, that you think I will now recommend it to you for purchase. Nothing could be more wrong. The problem is that everybody who reads this book will automatically become wealthy. Now that is just not acceptable because anyone who has studied Economics knows that, in any given society, we cannot all be wealthy. Wealth is categorised into two types: real value and use value. And the one we accumulate is use value. Use value is converted from real value. Real value is fundamentally limited on earth and human survival and future generations’ survival and development depend on it. And the worth of use value depends on it too. So Mr. Omojuwa, if you value civilization and do not wish to bring about a form of Armageddon, please do not sell this book to the general public because everyone that reads it will become rich. I suggest you now sit down with your editor and release it as chapters. There are 9 chapters so maybe release one a year. On a serious note though, Mr. Japheth Joshua Omojuwa, my brother. I am immensely proud of what you have achieved with this book

I am sure that I am not breaching a trust if I reveal that we are already discussing the next one and the one after that which by God’s grace will be published by Temple. Thank you for this extraordinary honour and I hope everyone can enjoy and experience this very important and remarkable book.

Terfa Tilley-Gyado